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Hotel Quisisana Palace***** • Marianskolazenska 298/3, 36001. Karlovy Vary (Czech Republic) •Tel.:00420 357 079 110Email
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Brief History of Quisisana Palace in Karlovy Vary

If we walk up the promenade along the Teplá River all the way to Grandhotel Pupp, we are instantly struck by the beauty of Quisisana Palace built in the "Golden Age" of Karlovy Vary, with its richly decorated facade articulated by numerous Italian-style loggias.

In its time, it was a truly grandiose building and the first of its kind in Karlovy Vary. It was erected in the era when the fourth generation of the Pupp family ruled on the other side of the Teplá River. The head of the family was Anton Heinrich Vinzenz Pupp (5 April 1841 – 7 October 1907) who owned a confectionery at Český sál (Czech Hall), a bakery at the house named the Queen of England (Königin von England) in Stará Louka (Old Meadow), and two more shops in Tržiště (Market). Anton Pupp was a successful entrepreneur from a wealthy family. As a far-sighted man, he chose for his bride an energetic maiden with a substantial dowry, Maria Katharina Mattoni (20 August 1843 – 12 December 1900), who was the sister of Heinrich Mattoni, the founder of the Kyselka Spa. Their marriage thus joined two of the wealthiest families in Karlovy Vary.

It was namely his wife Maria, for whom Anton Pupp decided to build Quisisana Palace in 1887 and 1888. He selected a site with a natural rocky terrace, which was the last vacant lot in the very attractive Mariánskolázeňská Street (Marienbadstrasse). According to archive records, a tragic accident happened on the construction site during the hewing of the rock and reinforcement of the retaining wall on 27 March 1888. Several people were buried under falling rock. The carcass was completed in late October 1888.

The actual author of the design remains unknown as the construction plans, according to which the architect and builder could be reliably identified, have not been found in the archives so far. The most likely authors may have been Alfred Bayer, the most proficient architect of that time who acquired valuable experience while working for the firm of renowned architects Fellner and Helmer in Vienna, or Karl Haybäck, another Viennese architect and professor Hansen's student who was mainly engaged in projects for the King of Mineral Waters, Heinrich Mattoni, or Viennese architects Příhoda and Němeček who were often commissioned by the Pupps.

Work on the new building interiors commenced in November 1888. All the rooms and staircases were richly decorated with stuccos over the upcoming winter. Subsequently, the walls in all residential premises were papered. The wide staircase, the corridors with the entrance hall, and the loggias were painted in white and golden colour. Tall large mirrors in gilded frames were installed at all floors. The segmented windows facing the retaining wall were richly etched with plant motifs and etching and grinding also decorated the interior doors. In spring 1889, the palace was fitted with luxurious furniture. The entire extended family of the Pupps and the Mattonis gathered for the grand opening.

In addition to serving as the residence of Anton Pupp's family, the ostentatious palace also accommodated numerous guests. In 1890, perhaps at the occasion of the visit of the Sultan of Soho, Anton Pupp and his wife founded the tradition of a visitors book, into which guests recorded their impressions and experiences from their stay and expressed their gratitude to their hosts. The first record in the visitors book is written in Arabic and it is fortunately appended with a German translation. Therefore, even after a hundred years, we may still read the Sultan's devout prayer:

May God in heavens hear my prayer: I, your slave, my Lord, who has hereunto set his hand, wish the builders of this house, Mr. and Mrs. Pupp, many blessings, good fortune and health. May God in his firm faith protect them day and night, and gild over their good deeds and those of their children."

The name "Quisisana" is of Italian origin and it translates as a place of healing, which is more than true in case of the Pupp family. In spring 1890, Anton Pupp founded a hotel company together with his brothers Julius and Heinrich. Anton Pupp became the first president of the newly established joint-stock company.On 23 and 24 November 1890, a massive flood on the Teplá River severely damaged properties in the possession of the Pupps, i.e. Český sál (Czech Hall), Saský sál (Saxony Hall), Zlatá harfa (Golden Harp), as well as other hotel buildings. Water also flooded the cellars and the ground floor of the Quisisana. In the following spa season, though, there was no trace of the flooding.

The earnings of the newly founded joint-stock company of the Pupps were large enough to allow the hotel company to generate profit soon after the flood. In 1892, Český sál (Czech Hall) was pulled down and two years later, the construction of Grandhotel Pupp commenced according to the design of Viennese architects Příhoda and Němeček. The construction costs amounted to several million Austrian crowns. Anton Pupp lived at the Quisisana until his death, admiring his hotel empire from above. After World War I, the Quisisana fell into the possession of Leo Pupp (the nephew of Anton Pupp and the last hotelier in the Pupp family) and his wife Emilia nee Kiffl (the daughter of the owner of Poštovní dvůr [Postal Court]). It served as a spa pension, providing accommodation to numerous spa guests from different countries, e.g. Germany, Austria, England, America, Poland, or Russia. The late 1920s brought the best seasons. At that time, the fourth floor was reconstructed and the original dormers were replaced by a loggia with a marvellous view of the surroundings. The newly refurbished guest rooms were already fitted with en-suite bathrooms illuminated by roof lights. Central heating was installed in the building and richly decorated tiled stoves were removed. The loggia on the ground floor was glassed-in due to practical reasons. The construction work was supervised and executed by local builders Kubiček and Baier.

In the 1930s, the number of visitors declined as a result of the Great Depression. The situation took a rapid downturn towards the end of the 1930s, with growing nationalist tensions and the gradual rise of the Sudeten German movement headed by Konrad Henlein. The restriction of money exports for spa guests from the Reich to 1,000 Reichsmarks per person also had a considerable impact since the limited sum was not enough to pay for their spa stay. The visitor rate continued to fall even further after the annexation of Sudetenland by the Third Reich. Nonetheless, the Quisisana had served as a spa house until 1943 when it met the fate of dozens of similar houses throughout Karlovy Vary and was converted into a army hospital. Wounded soldiers were moved here from the Charité Hospital in Berlin after the massive bombing of the capital. In June 1945, 45 patients including 22 severely wounded were treated here and attended by 8 nurses.

In September 1945, the Quisisana was confiscated from Emilia Pupp and her daughters, Elsa and Doris, based on the decrees issued by President Beneš. The District Administrative Commission appointed Otakar Kadlečka as the national administrator. However, before he was able to move in and relaunch hotel operations, the Quisisana, like many other buildings then, had already been occupied by the Red Army. The Quisisana was thus included among a group of highly attractive houses in Karlovy Vary (along with hotels Imperial, Richmond, or Grandhotel Pupp, or residences Neapol, Florencie, Regina, Sofie, Quirinal and Villa Margareta) that were to accommodate Soviet Army generals and officers.

According to records, the Russians vacated the Quisisana in autumn 1947. The building was in a poor condition, its interior furnishings and floorings were damaged, the windows were broken, and the entire premises had to be thoroughly disinfected.

In April 1948, the building fell under the so-called Collective National Administration of Hotel and Accommodation Enterprises in Karlovy Vary, after the dissolution of which it passed under the administration of Czechoslovak Hotels and with effect from 1 January 1950, it was entrusted to the competence of the Ministry of Health. At one time, it ended up "in the care" of the Czechoslovak People's Army Accommodation Administration. It served as an accommodation facility for army officers along with the Moskva (Moscow) army sanatorium, i.e. the former Grandhotel Pupp, established upon the order of the notorious communist minister and army general, Alexej Čepička. During Christmas 1951, the guests staying at the Quisisana witnessed a very dramatic event when a fire broke out in the jewel of the town, Grandhotel Pupp. Injured guests and firemen who had inhaled too much smoke while trying to fight with the blazes were carried to the Quisisana.

The end of 1960 finally put an end to the constant changes in the building management and the Quisisana was entrusted to the care of the Municipal National Committee of Karlovy Vary and the Housing Management Enterprise of Karlovy Vary. Regular tenants moved in, for whom kitchens and bathrooms were built. Rooms without any heating were fitted with facade gas heaters.

After 1989, the building remained in the possession of the city. However, since no maintenance or repairs had been carried out, the condition of the house was deteriorating. Based on the appraisal of design engineer carried out in 2001, the building was declared to be in an emergency condition and all tenants were gradually evacuated. The City of Karlovy Vary decided to save the building by selling it in an auction to the highest bidder.

In December 2005, the Quisisana was sold at an auction for CZK 77 million to Exklusive apartments, which launched its reconstruction in 2007. On 14 October 2010, a final building approval was issued, which approved the use of the newly reconstructed building for hotel and restaurant operations and wellness services under the name Quisisana Palace. Today, the deluxe boutique hotel and one of the rare jewels of Karlovy Vary is appraised by its guests as one of the best hotels in the country. Karlovy Vary, 25 February 2014

Elaborated and edited by: Alexander Mikoláš / Sylva Brouková Elaborated with the use of materials of Karlovy Vary historians: Milan Augustin, Stanislav Burachovič, Karel Nejdl, Lubomír Zeman; photo documentation taken from the archive of Jiří Böhm and from own archive materials.

If we walk up the promenade along the Teplá River all the way to Grandhotel Pupp, we are instantly struck by the beauty of Quisisana Palace built in the "Golden Age" of Karlovy Vary, with its richly decorated facade articulated by numerous Italian-style loggias.

In its time, it was a truly grandiose building and the first of its kind in Karlovy Vary. It was erected in the era when the fourth generation of the Pupp family ruled on the other side of the Teplá River. The head of the family was Anton Heinrich Vinzenz Pupp (5 April 1841 – 7 October 1907) who owned a confectionery at Český sál (Czech Hall), a bakery at the house named the Queen of England (Königin von England) in Stará Louka (Old Meadow), and two more shops in Tržiště (Market). Anton Pupp was a successful entrepreneur from a wealthy family. As a far-sighted man, he chose for his bride an energetic maiden with a substantial dowry, Maria Katharina Mattoni (20 August 1843 – 12 December 1900), who was the sister of Heinrich Mattoni, the founder of the Kyselka Spa. Their marriage thus joined two of the wealthiest families in Karlovy Vary.

It was namely his wife Maria, for whom Anton Pupp decided to build Quisisana Palace in 1887 and 1888. He selected a site with a natural rocky terrace, which was the last vacant lot in the very attractive Mariánskolázeňská Street (Marienbadstrasse). According to archive records, a tragic accident happened on the construction site during the hewing of the rock and reinforcement of the retaining wall on 27 March 1888. Several people were buried under falling rock. The carcass was completed in late October 1888.

The actual author of the design remains unknown as the construction plans, according to which the architect and builder could be reliably identified, have not been found in the archives so far. The most likely authors may have been Alfred Bayer, the most proficient architect of that time who acquired valuable experience while working for the firm of renowned architects Fellner and Helmer in Vienna, or Karl Haybäck, another Viennese architect and professor Hansen's student who was mainly engaged in projects for the King of Mineral Waters, Heinrich Mattoni, or Viennese architects Příhoda and Němeček who were often commissioned by the Pupps.

Work on the new building interiors commenced in November 1888. All the rooms and staircases were richly decorated with stuccos over the upcoming winter. Subsequently, the walls in all residential premises were papered. The wide staircase, the corridors with the entrance hall, and the loggias were painted in white and golden colour. Tall large mirrors in gilded frames were installed at all floors. The segmented windows facing the retaining wall were richly etched with plant motifs and etching and grinding also decorated the interior doors. In spring 1889, the palace was fitted with luxurious furniture. The entire extended family of the Pupps and the Mattonis gathered for the grand opening.

In addition to serving as the residence of Anton Pupp's family, the ostentatious palace also accommodated numerous guests. In 1890, perhaps at the occasion of the visit of the Sultan of Soho, Anton Pupp and his wife founded the tradition of a visitors book, into which guests recorded their impressions and experiences from their stay and expressed their gratitude to their hosts. The first record in the visitors book is written in Arabic and it is fortunately appended with a German translation. Therefore, even after a hundred years, we may still read the Sultan's devout prayer:

May God in heavens hear my prayer: I, your slave, my Lord, who has hereunto set his hand, wish the builders of this house, Mr. and Mrs. Pupp, many blessings, good fortune and health. May God in his firm faith protect them day and night, and gild over their good deeds and those of their children."

The name "Quisisana" is of Italian origin and it translates as a place of healing, which is more than true in case of the Pupp family. In spring 1890, Anton Pupp founded a hotel company together with his brothers Julius and Heinrich. Anton Pupp became the first president of the newly established joint-stock company.On 23 and 24 November 1890, a massive flood on the Teplá River severely damaged properties in the possession of the Pupps, i.e. Český sál (Czech Hall), Saský sál (Saxony Hall), Zlatá harfa (Golden Harp), as well as other hotel buildings. Water also flooded the cellars and the ground floor of the Quisisana. In the following spa season, though, there was no trace of the flooding.

The earnings of the newly founded joint-stock company of the Pupps were large enough to allow the hotel company to generate profit soon after the flood. In 1892, Český sál (Czech Hall) was pulled down and two years later, the construction of Grandhotel Pupp commenced according to the design of Viennese architects Příhoda and Němeček. The construction costs amounted to several million Austrian crowns. Anton Pupp lived at the Quisisana until his death, admiring his hotel empire from above. After World War I, the Quisisana fell into the possession of Leo Pupp (the nephew of Anton Pupp and the last hotelier in the Pupp family) and his wife Emilia nee Kiffl (the daughter of the owner of Poštovní dvůr [Postal Court]). It served as a spa pension, providing accommodation to numerous spa guests from different countries, e.g. Germany, Austria, England, America, Poland, or Russia. The late 1920s brought the best seasons. At that time, the fourth floor was reconstructed and the original dormers were replaced by a loggia with a marvellous view of the surroundings. The newly refurbished guest rooms were already fitted with en-suite bathrooms illuminated by roof lights. Central heating was installed in the building and richly decorated tiled stoves were removed. The loggia on the ground floor was glassed-in due to practical reasons. The construction work was supervised and executed by local builders Kubiček and Baier.

In the 1930s, the number of visitors declined as a result of the Great Depression. The situation took a rapid downturn towards the end of the 1930s, with growing nationalist tensions and the gradual rise of the Sudeten German movement headed by Konrad Henlein. The restriction of money exports for spa guests from the Reich to 1,000 Reichsmarks per person also had a considerable impact since the limited sum was not enough to pay for their spa stay. The visitor rate continued to fall even further after the annexation of Sudetenland by the Third Reich. Nonetheless, the Quisisana had served as a spa house until 1943 when it met the fate of dozens of similar houses throughout Karlovy Vary and was converted into a army hospital. Wounded soldiers were moved here from the Charité Hospital in Berlin after the massive bombing of the capital. In June 1945, 45 patients including 22 severely wounded were treated here and attended by 8 nurses.

In September 1945, the Quisisana was confiscated from Emilia Pupp and her daughters, Elsa and Doris, based on the decrees issued by President Beneš. The District Administrative Commission appointed Otakar Kadlečka as the national administrator. However, before he was able to move in and relaunch hotel operations, the Quisisana, like many other buildings then, had already been occupied by the Red Army. The Quisisana was thus included among a group of highly attractive houses in Karlovy Vary (along with hotels Imperial, Richmond, or Grandhotel Pupp, or residences Neapol, Florencie, Regina, Sofie, Quirinal and Villa Margareta) that were to accommodate Soviet Army generals and officers.

According to records, the Russians vacated the Quisisana in autumn 1947. The building was in a poor condition, its interior furnishings and floorings were damaged, the windows were broken, and the entire premises had to be thoroughly disinfected.

In April 1948, the building fell under the so-called Collective National Administration of Hotel and Accommodation Enterprises in Karlovy Vary, after the dissolution of which it passed under the administration of Czechoslovak Hotels and with effect from 1 January 1950, it was entrusted to the competence of the Ministry of Health. At one time, it ended up "in the care" of the Czechoslovak People's Army Accommodation Administration. It served as an accommodation facility for army officers along with the Moskva (Moscow) army sanatorium, i.e. the former Grandhotel Pupp, established upon the order of the notorious communist minister and army general, Alexej Čepička. During Christmas 1951, the guests staying at the Quisisana witnessed a very dramatic event when a fire broke out in the jewel of the town, Grandhotel Pupp. Injured guests and firemen who had inhaled too much smoke while trying to fight with the blazes were carried to the Quisisana.

The end of 1960 finally put an end to the constant changes in the building management and the Quisisana was entrusted to the care of the Municipal National Committee of Karlovy Vary and the Housing Management Enterprise of Karlovy Vary. Regular tenants moved in, for whom kitchens and bathrooms were built. Rooms without any heating were fitted with facade gas heaters.

After 1989, the building remained in the possession of the city. However, since no maintenance or repairs had been carried out, the condition of the house was deteriorating. Based on the appraisal of design engineer carried out in 2001, the building was declared to be in an emergency condition and all tenants were gradually evacuated. The City of Karlovy Vary decided to save the building by selling it in an auction to the highest bidder.

In December 2005, the Quisisana was sold at an auction for CZK 77 million to Exklusive apartments, which launched its reconstruction in 2007. On 14 October 2010, a final building approval was issued, which approved the use of the newly reconstructed building for hotel and restaurant operations and wellness services under the name Quisisana Palace. Today, the deluxe boutique hotel and one of the rare jewels of Karlovy Vary is appraised by its guests as one of the best hotels in the country. Karlovy Vary, 25 February 2014

Elaborated and edited by: Alexander Mikoláš / Sylva Brouková Elaborated with the use of materials of Karlovy Vary historians: Milan Augustin, Stanislav Burachovič, Karel Nejdl, Lubomír Zeman; photo documentation taken from the archive of Jiří Böhm and from own archive materials.

Café-Restaurant Quisisana
Café-Restaurant Quisisana Wellness

Café-Restaurant Quisisana

Modern Czech cuisine and seasonal specialities.

Wellness

Enjoy massages, sparkling salt baths, cosmetics and private SPA SUITE during your stay in our wellness center.

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CAFÉ-RESTAURANT QUISISANA

Enjoy modern Czech cuisine with exclusive atmosphere of Viennese-style café. Do not miss an opportunity to try our excellent coffee roasted by a local roster.

Restaurant

Book now and get complimentary 90 minutes of private SPA SUITE.

Hotel Quisisana Palace | Karlovy Vary | 3 reasons to stay with us - 1

Exclusive location in the historical centre of Karlovy Vary.

Hotel Quisisana Palace | Karlovy Vary | 3 reasons to stay with us - 2

Boutique hotel atmosphere in a stylishly restored 19th century residence.

Hotel Quisisana Palace | Karlovy Vary | 3 reasons to stay with us - 3